Tunnel carpien

08/04/2018

A systematic review of low level laser therapy with location-specific doses for pain from chronic joint disorders

Bjordal JM et al  Australian Journal of Physiotherapy 49: 107-116   We investigated if low level laser therapy (LLLT) of the joint capsule can reduce pain in chronic joint disorders. A literature search identified 88 randomised controlled trials, of which 20 trials included patients with chronic joint disorders. Six trials were excluded for not irradiating the joint capsule. Three trials used doses lower than a dose range nominated a priori for reducing inflammation in the joint capsule. These trials found no significant difference between active and placebo treatments. The remaining 11 trials including 565 patients were of acceptable methodological quality with an average PEDro score of 6.9 (range 5-9). In these trials, LLLT within the suggested dose range was administered to the knee, temporomandibular or zygapophyseal joints. The results showed a mean weighted difference in change of pain on VAS of 29.8 mm (95% CI, 18.9 to 40.7) in favour of the active LLLT groups. Global health status improved for more patients in the active LLLT groups ( relative risk of 0.52; 95% CI 0.36 to 0.76). Low level laser therapy with the suggested dose range significantly reduces pain and improves health status in chronic joint disorders, but the heterogeneity […]
08/04/2018

Low level laser therapy for tendinopathy. Evidence of a dose-response pattern

Bjordal JM et al University of Bergen, Section of Physiotherapy Science, 5020 Bergen, NORVEGE Physical Therapy Reviews 2001;6:91-99   To investigate whether low-level laser therapy (LLLT) can reduce pain from tendinopathy, we performed a review of randomized placebo-controlled trials with LLLT for tendinopathy. The literature search for trials using LLLT published after 1980 was conducted on Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Library, together with a hand-search of physiotherapy journals in English and Scandinavian languages. Validity assessment of each trial was done according to predefined criteria for location-specific dosage and irradiation of the skin directly overlying the affected tendon. The literature search identified 78 randomized controlled trials with LLLT, of which 20 included tendinopathy. Seven trials were excluded for not meeting validity criteria on treatment procedure or trial design. Twelve of the remaining 13 trials investigated the effect of LLLT for patients with subacute and chronic tendinopathy, and provided a pooled mean effect of 21% [95% confidence interval (CI) 5.9-36.1]. If results from only the nine trials adhering to assumed optimal treatment parameters were included, the mean effect over placebo increased to 32% (95% CI: 23.0-41.0). LLLT can reduce pain in subacute and chronic tendinopathy if a valid treatment procedure and […]
08/04/2018

Les mécanismes du laser doux – syndrome du tunnel carpien

Les résultats de ces changements biochimiques et cellulaires des animaux et des patients incluent des avantages tels que la guérison accrue dans les blessures chroniques, les améliorations dans des dommages de sports et le syndrome de tunnel de carpal, la réduction de douleur de l’arthrite et des neuropathies, et l’amélioration des dommages après les crises cardiaques, la course, les dommages de nerf et la toxicité rétinienne. Mechanisms of Low Level Light Therapy HAMBLIN Michael R., Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School and Harvard-MITDEMIDOVA Tatiana N., Massachusetts General Hospital and Tufts Univ. School of Medicine Progress in biomedical optics and imaging,  2006, vol. 7, no26, [Note(s): 614001.1-614001.12]     The use of low levels of visible or near infrared light for reducing pain, inflammation and edema, promoting healing of wounds, deeper tissues and nerves, and preventing tissue damage has been known for almost forty years since the invention of lasers. Originally thought to be a peculiar property of laser light (soft or cold lasers), the subject has now broadened to include photobiomodulation and photobiostimulation using non-coherent light. Despite many reports of positive findings from experiments conducted in vitro, in animal models and in randomized controlled clinical trials, LLLT remains controversial. This likely is due to two main reasons; […]
08/04/2018

“HEALTH”

– Sebastian Sun, October 9, 2003By Rachael Jackson, staff writer A new cold laser treatment can provide a surgery alternative for sufferers of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, athletic injuries; and other soft and connective tissue disorders. The treatment is painless and non-invasive and, according to MicrolightLaser®, its manufacturer, it can make the difference in full and partial recovery for Carpal Tunnel patients.   Cold, hard facts: New laser treats various illsFor years, the pain was so great Pat Ground couldn’t stand on her tiptoes. There were times when she could hardly walk. The Sebastian banker tried doctor after doctor, endured several types of treatments, but nothing seemed to make a real lasting difference in the swollen nerves in her feet. But now, after only a month of a new laser treatment by chiropractor Jeff Stepanek at Sebastian Chiropractic, Ground, 58, happily reports she can retrieve items from a top shelf without enduring tremendous pain from a condition called Morton’s Neuroma. Stepanek recently obtained the Microlight cold laser, which can treat a wide range of ailments. The laser offers a non-invasive treatment alternative for soft and connective tissue disorders such as athletic injuries, Morton’s Neuroma and Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, a stress injury […]
08/04/2018

LLLT using a diode laser in successful treatment of a herniated lumbar/sacral disc

Tatsuhide Abe Tatsuhide Abe, Abe Orthopaedic Clinic Futuoka City Fukuoka Prefecture Japan X12′  Laser Therapy 1989   A 40 year old woman presented at the clinic with a 2 year history of lower back pain and pain in the left hip an leg, diagnosed as a ruptured disc between the 5th lumber/1st sacral vertebrae. The condition had failed to respond to conventional treatment methods including pelvic traction, non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs and dural block anaesthetic injections. MRI scans were made of the affected disc, showing it protruding on the left side through the dural membrane. Treatment was used in outpatient therapy, and after 7 months, the patients condition had dramatically improved, demonstrated by motility exercises. This improvement was confirmed by further MRI scans, which clearlt showed the normal condition of the previously herniated L5/S1 disc.