Treatment of a dehydrated or compressed disc (degenerative disc disease, crushed disc or spinal osteoarthritis) with spinal decompression therapy

 

Introduction

La discopathie dégénérative, également connue sous le terme de «pincement discal,» est une affection qui cible les disques intervertébraux, ces coussinets essentiels situés entre les vertèbres de la colonne vertébrale. Ces disques ont une importance capitale dans la mobilité et la flexibilité de la colonne, permettant une large gamme de mouvements tout en absorbant les chocs. Contrairement à une croyance répandue, cette pathologie n’est pas nécessairement irréversible. En effet, dans la plupart des cas, la décompression neurovertébrale peut renverser le processus de dégénérescence en réhydratant et en réparant le disque affecté.

 

It is also important to note that pinched discs can have more serious consequences if not treated appropriately. One of these complications is foraminal stenosis. This medical term refers to the narrowing of the foramina, the openings on either side of the vertebrae through which spinal nerves pass. When these openings narrow, they can compress nerves, leading to pain, numbness, and other neurological problems. Thus, effective management of degenerative disc disease is crucial not only to relieve immediate symptoms, but also to prevent long-term complications such as foraminal stenosis.

 

Pincement Discal Clinique Tagmed Montréal Terrebonne

 

Symptoms, causes and diagnosis

Symptoms of degenerative disc disease can vary depending on the location of the lesion. Pain is often felt in the back or neck, but it can also radiate to the lower or upper limbs. Patients with degenerative disc disease may also experience neurological problems such as numbness or tingling. Additionally, they may experience muscle and joint stiffness, muscle weakness, and decreased mobility. These symptoms may be more common and severe in patients who have advanced degenerative disc disease or who have experienced physical trauma. It is important to consult a doctor if you experience these symptoms in order to obtain an accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment.

 

Degenerative disc disease can be associated with several disorders, including herniated discs, spinal stenosis (narrowing of the spinal canal), spondylolisthesis (sliding of one vertebra over another), and osteoarthritis. These disorders can worsen the symptoms of degenerative disc disease and often require specific medical or surgical treatment. It is therefore important to consult a doctor if you have degenerative disc disease to determine whether you also have other associated conditions that may require additional treatment.

 

Here is a list of 8 common symptoms associated with pinched disc:

  1. Pain in the lower back or lumbar region.
  2. Pain that radiates into the buttocks, legs and feet.
  3. Numbness or tingling in the legs and feet.
  4. Muscle weakness in the legs and feet.
  5. Difficulty standing or walking for long periods of time.
  6. Decreased spinal mobility.
  7. Stiffness in the back or surrounding muscles.
  8. Burning or hot sensation in the affected area.

 

Pinched disc is a medical condition in which an intervertebral disc, which acts as a shock absorber between the vertebrae, narrows and puts pressure on surrounding nerves and nerve roots. The severity of pinched disc can range from mild to severe, and symptoms can also vary depending on the degree of narrowing of the intervertebral disc.

 

In cases of mild disc pinching, the narrowing of the intervertebral disc is moderate and the pressure on the nerves is light. Symptoms may include lower back pain, muscle stiffness, pain radiating down the legs or arms, and mild muscle weakness.

 

In cases of moderate disc narrowing, there is greater narrowing of the intervertebral disc, which can further compress the nerves and nerve roots. Symptoms may include more severe lower back pain, muscle stiffness, pain radiating down the legs or arms, more muscle weakness, and tingling or burning sensation.

 

In cases of severe disc pinching, the narrowing of the intervertebral disc is very significant and can cause significant compression of the surrounding nerves and nerve roots. Symptoms may include severe lower back pain, muscle stiffness, pain radiating down the legs or arms, significant muscle weakness, and problems with coordination.

 

Here is an example chart that may help better understand the differences between mild, moderate, and severe disc pinch symptoms:

Symptoms Mild disc pinching Moderate disc pinching Severe disc pinching
Pain in the lower back Moderate Intense Very intense
Radiating pain in the legs or arms Lightweight Moderate Intense
Muscle stiffness Lightweight Moderate Important
Muscle weakness Lightweight Important Very important
Tingling or burning sensation Light Moderate Important
Loss of coordination No Possible Possible

As with foraminal stenosis and spinal stenosis, it is important to note that the symptoms of pinched discs can vary from person to person and the table above is a general example. If you are experiencing symptoms of a pinched disc, it is important to consult a healthcare professional for an accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment plan.

 

Causes of pinched disc

The causes of degenerative disc disease are multiple and complex. They can be linked to age, poor posture, physical trauma or even a genetic predisposition.

 

Indeed, the causes of degenerative disc disease are multiple and complex. They may include:

  • Natural aging: With age, intervertebral discs lose elasticity and hydration, which can lead to cracks and ruptures.

  • Trauma: repeated shocks or direct injuries to the spine can damage the intervertebral discs.

  • Repetitive movements: Certain occupations that involve repetitive movements or prolonged sitting may increase the risk of developing degenerative disc disease.

  • Genetic factors: some people can inherit a predisposition to develop back problems.

  • Postural disorders: certain postural disorders such as scoliosis can put excessive pressure on the intervertebral discs.

 

It is important to note that these factors are not exclusive and a mixture of several of them can contribute to the development of degenerative disc disease.

 

Trauma and repetitive motion can both lead to degenerative disc disease by putting excess pressure on the intervertebral discs. Trauma, such as car accidents or falls, can cause ruptures in the intervertebral disc, which can lead to a loss of elasticity and height of the disc. The result is an increased risk of cracked and herniated discs.

 

 

Repetitive movements, such as those performed in certain occupations like handling heavy loads or prolonged driving, can also cause excessive wear and tear on the spinal discs. Repetitive movements can also cause increased compression on the intervertebral discs, which can lead to them rupturing.

 

 

In both cases, the increased pressure on the intervertebral discs can damage their structure and normal functioning. This can lead to chronic back pain and other symptoms associated with degenerative disc disease.

 

Diagnosis of pinched disc

The diagnosis of this pathology is based on a thorough clinical examination as well as imaging examinations such as x-rays, MRI or CT scan.

 

It is important to understand that a degenerated disc can increase your risk of developing other spinal conditions. Here are some common spinal problems that are often associated with degenerated discs:

  • Spinal stenosis: This happens when the spaces in your spine narrow, putting pressure on your nerves and causing pain or numbness in your legs or arms.
  • Foraminal stenosis: a condition where the foramen in the spine through which nerves exit are narrowed, which can cause pain and numbness in the arms or legs.
  • Spondylolisthesis: This is a condition where one vertebra slides forward over another underneath. This can cause lower back pain and muscle weakness.
  • Spondylolysis: This is a stress fracture in one of the vertebrae of the spine. It can cause lower back pain that gets worse with activity.
  • Disc protrusion or bulging: is a condition where the intervertebral disc that sits between the vertebrae of the spine begins to extend beyond its position. normal. This can happen when the disc experiences excessive pressure.
  • Herniated disc: a condition where the gelatinous core of an intervertebral disc moves out of its normal position and compresses the spinal nerves.
  • Cervical or lumbar radiculopathy: a condition where the roots of the nerves in the spine are compressed, which can cause pain and numbness in the arms (in cervical radiculopathy) or legs (in lumbar radiculopathy).
  • Degenerative scoliosis: a condition where the spine curves abnormally due to wear and tear on the spinal discs and joints.
  • Spinal osteoarthritis: a degenerative disease of the joints of the spine that can cause pain, stiffness, and loss of mobility. It is caused by natural wear and tear on the discs and joints of the spine and can be exacerbated by aging, obesity or previous injuries.

 

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Disc narrowing treatment

Treatment of degenerative disc disease aims primarily to relieve symptoms and prevent the disease from worsening. It may include pain medication, osteopathy sessions or even corticosteroid infiltrations to reduce inflammation.

 

The spinal decompression is a non-surgical treatment option for people suffering from a pinched disc. This technique involves applying gentle, progressive force to the spine, which helps reduce pressure on the intervertebral discs.

 

During a spinal decompression session, the patient lies on a special table equipped with a harness. The harness is strapped around the patient's hips and legs, then the table begins to move slowly. This movement gently pulls the spine in a specific direction, which helps stretch the soft tissues and relieve pressure on the intervertebral discs.

 

Spinal decompression can help relieve symptoms associated with pinched discs, such as chronic back pain and numbness or tingling in the limbs. Patients may need several sessions to achieve complete symptom relief.

 

It should be noted that spinal decompression is not recommended for everyone and may not be effective in all cases. It is important to consult a healthcare professional to determine if this technique is appropriate for your particular situation.

 

Conclusion

In short, degenerative disc disease is a condition that should not be taken lightly, given its potential to cause persistent pain and neurological complications. The importance of early diagnosis cannot be emphasized enough, as it paves the way for targeted and timely medical care. This diagnostic approach may include a variety of methods, from medical imaging to neurological testing, to determine the extent and severity of the condition.

 

Currently available treatment options are primarily focused on managing symptoms and improving quality of life. However, it is important to note that certain treatment modalities, such as spinal decompression therapy combined with osteopathy, offer benefits that go beyond simple pain relief. Indeed, when the damage to the disc is not too advanced, this combination of treatments can not only alleviate painful symptoms but also allow the disc to rehydrate and repair itself. This synergy between spinal decompression therapy and osteopathy therefore offers a more holistic and potentially curative approach, aimed at treating the underlying cause of degenerative disc disease. Thus, the goal is not only to manage symptoms in the short term, but also to implement long-term care strategies to promote tissue repair and minimize the risk of recurrence.

 

Published research/studies in Spinal Decompression Therapy

 

Download the research that has been published regarding spinal decompression therapy:

 

Pincement Discal Clinique Tagmed Montréal Terrebonne

 

FREE special report on spinal decompression to download

Pincement Discal Clinique Tagmed Montréal Terrebonne

 

To find out more about non-surgical spinal decompression therapy, please visit our specialized websites:

 

 

Preparations for spinal decompression therapy treatment for pinched disc

  • Book your appointment online or contact our staff at the TAGMED clinic to book your appointment by phone.
  • Before going to the TAGMED clinic in Montreal or Terrebonne for your first treatment, there are some things you should absolutely do. First, make sure you have your medical imaging reports (X-ray, MRI, or ultrasound) available.
  • Also, make sure you are aware of the various possible risks and side effects associated with treatment at Tagmed Clinic. You should also take all necessary measures (ex. Apply ice to the inflamed area to ensure that your body is ready for further treatment.
  • Also, make sure you are aware of the various possible risks and side effects associated with treatment at Tagmed Clinic. You should also take all necessary measures (ex. Apply ice to the inflamed area to ensure that your body is ready for further treatment.
  • Finally, if you were unable to complete our form, as mentioned above, arrive 15 minutes before your appointment time to ensure you have enough time to discuss your condition, make the assessment and your treatment.

To be completed before your consultation at TAGMED clinic

Download, print and complete this questionnaire (your health history), before consulting us, in order to save time. (Click on the tablet!)

TAGMED CLINIC
Terrebonne:

1150 rue Levis, suite 200, Terrebonne, QC, J6W 5S6
 (450) 704-4447

TAGMED CLINIC
Montreal

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 1-877-672-9060