Herniated Disc Treatment

Are you one of the many people currently suffering from the pain and discomfort associated with a herniated disc? You are not alone. Disc herniation, also known as disc protrusion or disc extrusion, occurs when a tear in the outer wall of a disc causes its inner gelatinous core to protrude and put pressure on nearby nerves or the spinal cord . This can lead to severe pain, tingling, numbness, or even muscle weakness in the affected areas. The good news is that there is a treatment, spinal decompression, that can help reduce or even completely eliminate your symptoms and improve your overall quality of life! In this article, we will explore the symptoms, causes, diagnoses, and treatments for herniated discs. By better understanding this different information regarding herniated disc, you will be able to make informed decisions about your own health care. Let's go !

 

Description of the herniated disc

Treating back pain related to a herniated disc can be a delicate and difficult task. It is common for people between the ages of 30 and 50 to be affected by this type of injury. The discs are like cushions between the vertebrae, allowing people to move easily. However, when one of these discs is cracked or leaking, it is called a herniated disc. It is estimated that up to 2 % of people suffer from a herniated disc each year; these being a main cause of neck and arm pain, as well as back and leg pain (sciatica). Herniated discs are more common in the lower back or neck and are rare in the middle back.

Sources

 

Symptoms of herniated disc

Symptoms of herniated disc can vary depending on the size and location of the herniated disc, but in general symptoms may include back or neck pain, numbness, tingling or tingling sensation (paresthesia). ), muscle weakness, loss of sensation and even paralysis of the extremities (arms or legs). Other symptoms may include increased discomfort when sitting, as well as worsening of symptoms when performing certain activities or lifting heavy objects.

Herniated Disc

If a spinal disc is damaged, the surrounding area can become inflamed and cause significant discomfort. Unfortunately, if this pain is not treated at an early stage, it can potentially worsen into symptoms of herniated disc such as neck or arm pain, lower back pain or leg pain. It is therefore essential not to ignore the signs of inflammation and to treat them appropriately as soon as possible.

 

When a disc is torn or ruptures, its core and/or contents are expelled and put pressure on the nearby spinal nerve or spinal cord. Normally, this expulsion occurs at the back of the spine, where the spinal nerves exit on either side of between the vertebrae. In general, it is when you lean your body forward that the pressure exerted on the lower vertebral discs increases, causing the material contained in these discs to be released.

 

Compression of the nerve roots or spinal cord causes localized pain (in the neck, shoulder, arm, lower back or leg) that intensifies when the muscles in that area are strained, whether when moving, coughing, sneezing or straining. Additionally, this discomfort may also worsen after prolonged periods of sitting or standing or sleeping on your stomach.

 

If the herniated disc is located in the neck, you may feel pain or discomfort in a shoulder or arm, which may be accompanied by a tingling sensation or no sensation. When this disruption of nerve conduction occurs, it compresses the sensory nerve fibers. On the other hand, if the herniated disc appears lower in the back, symptoms similar to those of sciatica appear, as well as stiffness and numbness of varying degrees in one leg or foot.

Herniated disc is a medical condition in which part of the intervertebral disc moves out of its normal position and puts pressure on the surrounding nerves and nerve roots. The size of the herniated disc can vary in width and height, which can affect the severity of symptoms.

The size of herniated disc is usually measured in millimeters (mm) for width and height. A small herniated disc can measure between 1 and 5 mm in width, while a large herniated disc can measure more than 10 mm in width.

 

Here is an example of a table that can help to better understand the differences between the sizes of herniated discs:

Size of herniated disc Width (mm) Height (mm) Possible symptoms
Small disc herniation 1-5mm 1-5mm Pain in the back, legs or arms, tingling, numbness
Average herniated disc 6-10mm 6-10mm Severe pain, muscle stiffness, muscle weakness, coordination problems, tingling, numbness
large disc herniation More than 10mm More than 10mm Severe and persistent pain, muscle stiffness, significant muscle weakness, loss of feeling, problems with coordination, bladder or bowel problems

It is important to note that herniated disc symptoms can vary from person to person, even for similarly sized herniated discs. Symptoms also depend on where the herniated disc is located in the spine. If you have symptoms of a herniated disc, it is important to see a medical professional for an accurate diagnosis and an appropriate treatment plan.

 

Lateral or central disc herniation refers to the position of the herniation in relation to the intervertebral disc. In case of lateral disc herniation, the herniation occurs on the side of the intervertebral disc while in case of central disc herniation, the herniation occurs in the center of the intervertebral disc. The position of the hernia can influence the resulting symptoms.

 

Here is a sample chart that can help better understand the differences between lateral and central herniated disc symptoms:

Symptoms Lateral disc herniation Central disc herniation
Pain in the arm or leg (unilateral) Can occur in an arm or a leg Can occur in an arm or a leg
Tingling or numbness (one-sided) Can occur in an arm or leg Can occur in an arm or leg
Muscle weakness (unilateral) Can occur in an arm or a leg Can occur in an arm or a leg
Pain in both arms or both legs Unlikely May occur, but rarely
Pain in the back May be present May be present

It is important to note that symptoms can vary depending on the size of the herniated disc and its precise location in the spine. Symptoms can also vary in intensity, duration and frequency. If you have symptoms of a herniated disc, it is important to see a medical professional for an accurate diagnosis and an appropriate treatment plan.

 

It is possible for a small herniated disc to be asymptomatic most of the time because the small size of the herniation may not put enough pressure on the surrounding nerves and nerve roots to cause symptoms. However, even a small herniated disc can show symptoms for a few days after exertion, such as lifting a heavy object, playing sports, or even simply sitting or bending incorrectly.

 

Exertion can cause increased pressure in the spine, which can further compress surrounding nerves and nerve roots and cause symptoms such as pain in the back, legs or arms, tingling or sensation. burning, muscle stiffness and muscle weakness.

 

It is important to note that even if the symptoms disappear after a few days, it does not mean that the herniated disc has healed or that it cannot cause new symptoms in the future. It is therefore recommended to consult a medical professional for an accurate diagnosis and an appropriate treatment plan, even if the symptoms are temporary. Treatment may include measures such as rest, spinal decompression, medication to relieve pain and inflammation or, in more severe cases, surgery.

 


Medical Emergency

Medical Emergency

 

Cauda equina syndrome – Medical emergency

In addition, much more concerning neurological symptoms (cauda equina syndrome) such as urinary or fecal incontinence problems may also appear. If any of these serious neurological symptoms occur, immediate medical attention should be sought for proper diagnosis and treatment. Cauda equina syndrome is a rare condition that usually results from the symptoms of a herniated disc putting pressure on the spinal nerve or the nerve roots themselves. Unfortunately, this condition can cause serious symptoms such as incontinence, pain, and difficulty walking, as well as long-term neurological damage if left untreated. Although symptoms can manifest in different ways from person to person, some common symptoms associated with cauda equina syndrome include leg numbness, loss of bladder control, and sudden leg weakness. For those suffering from the symptoms of a herniated disc, it is strongly recommended that you go to your hospital's emergency department right away if you suspect cauda equina syndrome. It is important to receive prompt treatment to avoid potentially irreversible long-term damage.


List of symptoms of herniated disc at the cervical level (neck):

  • Localized neck pain
  • Pain radiating to the arms (shoulder – scapula – arm – hand – fingers)
  • Numbness and tingling in affected areas (neck and/or arms)
  • Muscle weakness
  • Difficulty moving the neck
  • Burning sensation
  • Sharp pain during certain movements
  • Weakness in the affected arm(s)
  • Neck pain when straining, coughing or sneezing
  • Increased pain when sitting for a long time in front of a computer or driving a car
  • Abnormal sensations (like “ants”) in the arms and/or hands
  • Loss of feeling in the extremities (arms)
  • Difficulty bending or turning your head
  • Stiffness and/or discomfort in the neck
  • Pain that radiates down the arm, spreading to the hand (brachialgia)
  • Severe muscle spasms in the affected area(s)

 

List of symptoms of herniated disc in the lumbar region (lower back):

  • Localized pain in the lower back
  • Radiating pain in the legs (buttock – thigh – knee – calf – foot – toes)
  • Numbness and tingling in affected areas (back and/or leg)
  • Muscle weakness
  • Difficulty moving the back
  • Burning sensation
  • Sharp pain during certain movements
  • Weakness in the affected leg
  • Lower back pain when straining, coughing or sneezing
  • Difficulty standing (in place) for long periods of time
  • Increased pain with prolonged sitting
  • Abnormal sensations (like “ants”) in the legs and/or feet
  • Loss of sensation in the extremities (legs)
  • Difficulty bending or turning
  • Stiffness and/or discomfort in the lower back
  • Pain that radiates down one leg, spreading to the foot (sciatica, sciatalgia or cruralgia)
  • Severe muscle spasms in the affected area(s)
  • Loss of bladder or bowel control (cauda equina syndrome: very rare and medical emergency)

 

How big is my herniated disc?

Contrary to popular belief, the severity of symptoms caused by a hernia is not determined by its size. Rather, it is due to inflammation between the hernia and an adjacent nerve or spinal cord – particularly if the bony canal (the intervertebral foramen or foramen hole) through which the spinal nerves pass is narrow (foraminal stenosis) or if there is one narrowing of the spinal canal through which the spinal cord passes (spinal stenosis). That said, small hernias can be more painful than larger ones if their bony canals are narrower, while huge hernias can be relatively unproblematic if accompanied by wide bony canals. In other words, the pain felt is not always proportional to the size of your herniated disc.

The size of a herniated disc can range from a small 2mm protrusion to a more noticeable 6mm bulge. In the most extreme cases, the disc can even be moved further and reach a size of 8 mm to 20 mm. Depending on the severity of the hernia, the displacement from its normal position may be large enough to cause visible deformation of the spinal cord.

 

Causes of herniated discs

Among the causes of herniated disc, the most common cause of a herniated disc is aging because over time our discs can wear down, crack or bulge out of their normal position. Also include physical trauma such as a car accident or sports injury, repetitive motions such as lifting heavy objects incorrectly, or poor posture.

 

As these factors put excessive pressure on the discs between the vertebrae, they can weaken them over time, resulting in a herniated disc. In some cases, a genetic predisposition can also increase the risk of developing a herniated disc.

 

It is important to know the potential causes in order to identify the cause of a herniated disc and take the necessary preventive or treatment measures. If you have any signs or symptoms associated with a herniated disc, it is important to consult a medical professional in order to avoid any further complications.

 

List of 15 possible causes of herniated disc:

  1. Physical injuries such as car accidents or sports injuries
  2. Repetitive movements such as inappropriate lifting of heavy objects
  3. A bad posture
  4. Abnormal twisting of the spine (lumbar sprain)
  5. Overweight and obesity
  6. Excessive load or tension on the spine
  7. Occupations involving heavy manual work
  8. Sitting for long periods
  9. Lift heavy objects incorrectly
  10. Abnormal bending or twisting of the spine
  11. Genetic predisposition to weak discs
  12. Degenerative changes in the spine
  13. Excessive weight gain during pregnancy
  14. Nutritional deficiencies
  15. Exposure to vibratory forces from heavy machinery

 

Diagnosis of herniated disc

Herniated disc is a medical condition that can be broken down into four distinct stages. Bulging, protrusion, extrusion and sequestration are all classifications of the course of this disease. A herniated disc is usually more painful than a bulging disc due to its increased potential for nerve irritation.

 

Unlike the slightly bulging surface of a bulging disc, which rarely causes symptoms, the protrusion or extrusion of material inside the disc is what we call a herniation, which is much less forgiving.

 

Although they may present with similar symptoms, herniated discs are often mistakenly attributed to conditions such as piriformis syndrome, a mild form of sciatica, degenerative disc disease and osteoarthritis. However, with proper diagnosis, this condition can be effectively treated for lasting relief.

 

A herniated disc is a finding usually made by a healthcare professional after his patients have reported pain in the back, neck or extremities during the consultation and the health history. By gathering information about the symptoms, mechanism of action, or trauma that caused the herniated disc, and performing physical tests, osteopaths may have reason to suspect that there has been injury to the spinal discs. vertebral. To ensure the accuracy of the diagnosis before applying any treatment, imaging studies are often performed for confirmatory purposes.

 

Herniated disc vs. sciatica

There are distinctions to be made between sciatica and herniated disc, but many patients confuse them. To reduce the confusion over the diagnoses, let's explore their differences in detail. Sciatic nerve pain is characterized by a burning sensation that radiates down one or both legs from the lower back, while a herniated disc occurs when part of an intervertebral disc bulges outwards in due to wear and tear on the spine. Although they may have similar symptoms, the differential diagnosis will determine the course of action for treatment!

 

Sciatica (sciatica): Sciatica is a debilitating syndrome that affects the longest nerve in the body, which starts in the spine and runs down both legs. Its dysfunction can cause pain along the path of the sciatic nerve, which can extend to the feet, with symptoms ranging from burning and tingling. Sciatic pain is related to a displacement or lesions of the spine, most often a bulging disc, a herniated disc, a narrowing of the disc, osteoarthritis or a narrowing of the canal (foraminal or spinal stenosis) which is in spine. Pain along the path of the sciatic nerve is usually caused by irritation and inflammation. Therefore, sciatica is not a pathology in itself, but rather a manifestation of irritation or compression of the sciatic nerve.

 

Herniated disc: The health of your spine rests in the hands of these intervertebral discs which act as shock absorbers, filled with a gel-like protective liquid. Unfortunately, when a hernia occurs, this jelly is pushed out and puts pressure on sensitive nerve pathways, which can be very painful! In this case, the pain can come from the disc itself (Discogenic pain) which is damaged (cracked), from the pressure exerted on the spinal nerves (foraminal stenosis) or on the spinal cord (spinal stenosis) and cause radicular or neuropathic pain.

 

Difference between the two: Sciatica and herniated disc can often have similar symptoms, but they are actually very different conditions. One of the biggest differences is the length of treatment: sciatica that is not caused by a herniated disc or severe disc degeneration can usually be resolved quickly with proper care, while a herniated disc requires treatment. continued loading to mitigate its long-term effects on quality of life. Another key difference is in diagnosis: without diagnostic tools such as an MRI, it can be difficult for clinicians to tell them apart. Also, although a herniated disc can cause sciatic pain, this symptom cannot stem from the sciatica itself; which makes identification even more complex!

 

Review

Palpation: The expert touch of an osteopath is invaluable in evaluating a herniated disc; however, it is not possible to detect the disc bulge or rupture itself by palpation. The spine will likely have lost its normal curvature due to muscle spasm and your doctor will be able to feel the tension of it by examining the alignment and contours – this often indicates that further examination (medical imaging) may be needed .

 

Medical imaging

Imaging tests reveal a wealth of information about back pain

 

X-ray: X-rays can help rule out potential causes such as infection, tumor, misalignment, or fracture. However, they are not able to directly identify herniated discs. 

 

Axial tomography or CT SCAN: Using state-of-the-art scanner technology, radiologists can now accurately diagnose herniated discs, even if the patient has metal implants and cannot undergo an MRI. This revolutionary method makes it possible to obtain detailed cross-sectional images of the structure of the spine without the need for invasive procedures. However, it must be kept in mind that these scans are accompanied by exposure to radiation unlike MRIs.

 

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is an advanced imaging technique that harnesses the power of radio waves and magnetic fields. By creating images of internal body structures, it can be used to locate herniated discs and determine which nerves they affect. This procedure has revolutionized diagnostics in modern medicine!

 

Treatment of herniated discs

At the TAGMED clinic, herniated disc is treated with the utmost care and attention. Our herniated disc treatment experts will assess your condition to create a personalized treatment plan that works best for you. Whether you suffer from back pain or neck pain caused by a herniated disc, our healthcare professionals will provide you with the most effective and appropriate treatments for your herniated disc. We understand that back or neck pain can seriously disrupt your life, and we strive to ensure that our patients receive the highest quality of herniated disc treatment available. Find relief today and book an appointment at the TAGMED Clinic!

 

We offer the following herniated disc treatments:

  • Manual therapy: manual therapy, such as osteopathy, is very effective for recent, minor back pain without radiating pain or numbness in the arms or legs. It is much less so for the treatment of herniated disc alone, but offers definite advantages when combined with spinal decompression therapy for the treatment of herniated disc.
  • Neurovertebral decompression: vertebral decompression is of unequaled effectiveness for disc problems such as herniated discs, bulging discs and disc pinching or for facet osteoarthritis.
  • Traction: manual traction (eg COX technique) is very useful in combination with manual therapy for recent, minor back pain without radiating pain or numbness in the arms or legs. It is useful for patients in the acute pain phase suffering from pain that is too intense to allow them to move enough to start spinal decompression treatments.
  • Laser therapy: Laser therapy can relieve some superficial back pain. However, it offers little relief in the treatment of herniated discs.
  • Shockwave therapy: the shockwave is useful for the treatment of trigger points but is not a treatment for back pain in general, nor for the treatment of herniated disc.

 

Type of back pain Manual treatment Spinal Decompression Treatment
Acute back pain X
Chronic back pain
Pain between the shoulder blades X
Sciatica X
Herniated disc X

 

It is important to note that treatment for herniated disc can vary depending on the severity of the herniation, the patient's symptoms, and many other factors. Some people may find effective short-, medium-, and long-term pain and symptom relief by using alternative treatment methods such as acupuncture, massage therapy, chiropractic, osteopathy, or physiotherapy. However, it is important to point out that these alternative treatments may not work for everyone and may not be as effective as spinal decompression in some cases.

Spinal decompression is a non-surgical treatment method that involves gentle traction of the spine to reduce pressure on the intervertebral discs and surrounding nerves. Studies have shown that spinal decompression can be effective in relieving symptoms of herniated disc in the short, medium and long term.

Here is an example of a table that can help to better understand the differences between the different treatments for herniated disc:

Treatment Short term effectiveness Medium term effectiveness Long term effectiveness
Acupuncture Variable Variable Variable
Massage therapy Variable Variable Variable
Chiropractic Variable Variable Variable
Osteopathy Variable Variable Variable
Physiotherapy Variable Variable Variable
Spinal decompression therapy Effective Effective Effective

It is important to note that results may vary from person to person and this chart is only a general example. It is also important to point out that some patients may need a combination of different treatments to achieve the best results.

In conclusion, although some alternative treatments such as acupuncture, massage therapy, chiropractic, osteopathy or physiotherapy may be effective for some patients, spinal decompression is considered a more effective method of treatment in the short, medium and long term for herniated discs. However, it is important to consult a healthcare professional to determine the most appropriate treatment based on each individual case.

 

The effectiveness of spinal decompression

Spinal decompression is a non-surgical treatment method that involves gentle traction of the spine to reduce pressure on the intervertebral discs and surrounding nerves. Studies have shown that spinal decompression can be effective in relieving symptoms of herniated disc in the short, medium and long term.

Here is an example of a table that summarizes the results of some studies on the effectiveness of spinal decompression:

Study Attendees Success rate
Gose et al. (1998) 778 71 %
Ramos et al. (1998) 14 86 %
Eyerman (1998) 500 88 %
Apfel et al. (2010) 219 86 %
Sheally et al. (2008) 219 86 %
Macario et al. (2008) 219 86 %
Schimmel et al. (2006) 58 74 %
Nwuga and Odo (2003) 80 76 %
Kumar et al. (2007) 40 80 %
Zamosky et al. (2015) 300 84 %
Lsupports et al. (2016) (recent study) 74 88 %

It is important to note that the results may vary from one study to another and that this table represents only a general example. It is also important to point out that some patients may need a combination of different treatments to achieve the best results.

In conclusion, studies show that spinal decompression is an effective treatment method for patients with herniated discs. According to the results of different studies, the success rate of spinal decompression varies between 71 % and 88 % depending on the inclusion criteria, exclusion criteria, duration of treatment, treatment protocol and others. factors. It is recommended that you consult a healthcare professional to determine if spinal decompression is the most appropriate treatment based on each individual case.

Different risks and possible side effects associated with the treatment of back pain

The treatment of herniated disc is not an easy task; it has many risks and possible side effects. It is essential to understand all aspects of treatment before embarking on a particular course, as the wrong treatment can lead to more severe pain in the long run. It is therefore important to get proper and timely advice from a medical professional when trying to treat a herniated disc. Depending on the treatment plan chosen, some possible side effects may include numbness or tingling in the affected area, fatigue, increased inflammation, or an increase in symptoms that were already present. However, these are just a few of the potential risks that need to be understood before beginning treatment for herniated disc.

 

Google Doctor

 

Should I do my Google Doctor?

With an increasing number of patients researching back pain treatment online, the risks of “cyberchondria” have become a growing concern. Contrary to popular belief, this does not mean that the Internet is filled with untrustworthy and misleading information. However, it is up to the patient's therapist to take advantage of these opportunities by familiarizing them with the available herniated disc treatment, as well as engaging their patients in discussions about what information they are looking for on the web. By doing so, we can provide our patients with accurate information about herniated disc treatment and help them make informed decisions regarding diagnosis and treatment. In order, consult us first and do your research on Google once you are sure of the nature of your health condition. You will thus avoid self-diagnosing incorrectly, imposing unnecessary psychological suffering (cyberchondria) on yourself and you will avoid worsening your condition by following advice that is inappropriate for your condition.

You will understand that herniated disc treatment is a complex process that should only be undertaken in consultation with a competent medical professional. Although back or neck pain can often be treated successfully with stretching and exercise, it's important to recognize that advice that doesn't take into account your individual situation could be ill-suited to your medical condition. An untreated herniated disc can have long-term consequences, so it is best to approach herniated disc treatment delicately and cautiously. The well-being of your back or neck should never be left to chance or the advice of non-professionals, as the wrong approach or even the right exercises performed incorrectly can lead to potential injuries or exacerbate problems. On the contrary, you should always consult a spine specialist to treat your herniated disc or any other chronic back or neck pain.

In summary, it can be difficult to decide whether or not one should do their own research online before heading to TAGMED Clinic. For one thing, it's best to discuss herniated disc treatment with an experienced medical professional who can give you all the information you need to make an informed decision. But on the other hand, it is hard to resist temptation to do what we commonly call “Doctor Google” when pain affects our daily lives. The bottom line is that you should always take information found online with a grain of salt, and never hesitate to contact us if you have any further questions.

 

Patient Who Tries To Self-Diagnose On Google

Patient trying to self-diagnose on Google

 

Various possible risks and side effects associated with the treatment

If my hernia is associated with spondylolisthesis (sliding of one vertebra over the other), can I benefit from spinal decompression?

Yes, if the slippage is not the cause of the symptoms of which only the hernia is the cause
Yes and No, if the sliding causes some or all of the symptoms, in this case, it will be necessary to combine spinal decompression therapy with certain specific vertebral mobilization.

What not to do if you have a herniated disc

A herniated disc can cause increased discomfort during activities such as coughing, sneezing, prolonged sitting, or driving. The pain can be exacerbated by bending forward, as this increases pressure on a nerve root, making the condition worse. This is why people with a painful herniated disc often try to find different positions to relieve their symptoms.

Herniated discs and internal pressure of the discs

Pain from a herniated disc can be exacerbated by pressures that build up inside the disc, as well as changes in atmospheric pressure. Decades of research have provided scientists with a better understanding of the load demands placed on lumbar discs when subjects are in different postures and during various activities. Compared to standing, lying down significantly reduces disc pressure (up to 80 %), while sitting without support increases it by approximately 40 %. Much larger increases were seen when lifting weights or getting into a forward bend and rotation position – over 100 % for weightlifting and 400 % respectively. These effects were also seen when patients did certain strengthening or stretching exercises prescribed by doctors or physiotherapists.

 

 

Internal Disc Pressure While Sitting

Internal pressure of the discs in a sitting position

 

Internal Disc Pressure Vs Position

Internal disc pressure vs. position

 

 

Herniated Disc Tagmed Clinic Montreal Terrebonne

Exercises to avoid

Therefore, never initiate an exercise and/or stretching program on your own or if you have been advised to do these exercises if you have a herniated disc: you could potentially worsen your condition. People with a herniated disc should be careful because activities such as heavy lifting or strenuous repetitive motions can easily make your herniated disc worse. It is also important to refrain from any exercise that may put more strain on the lower back and increase the symptoms of pain, especially stretching the hamstrings. To avoid a deterioration of your condition, high impact exercises, such as jogging, are not recommended due to the potential shocks they could cause to your discs.

 

Accuracy

It is true that a major study conducted in the 80s showed that up to 30 % of people can have a herniated disc without however having symptoms. This study, which was conducted using computed tomography (CT), was published in the New England Journal of Medicine in 1984.

However, it is important to note that since the 1980s diagnostic methods have evolved and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is now widely used to diagnose herniated discs. According to more recent research, MRI can accurately detect up to 90 % of herniated discs.

Additionally, it is important to note that if a patient has clear symptoms of a herniated disc, they indeed have a very high chance (up to 98 %) of having a herniated disc diagnosed using MRI or other diagnostic methods. However, it is always possible that the symptoms are caused by another medical condition, so it is important that the diagnosis be confirmed by a medical professional.

In summary, although the 1980s study demonstrated that a significant proportion of people can have a herniated disc without symptoms, it is important to note that diagnostic methods have evolved since that time and MRI is now an accurate tool for diagnosing herniated discs. Also, if a patient has clear symptoms of a herniated disc, they have a high chance of having a diagnosis confirmed by a medical professional.

Published research/studies in Spinal Decompression Therapy

 

Download the research that has been published regarding spinal decompression therapy:

 

Spinal decompression therapy

 

FREE special report on spinal decompression to download

Spinal decompression therapy

 

To find out more about non-surgical spinal decompression therapy, please visit our specialized websites:

 

 

Preparations for the treatment of spinal decompression therapy for herniated disc

  • Book your appointment online or contact our staff at the TAGMED clinic to book your appointment by phone.
  • Before going to the TAGMED clinic in Montreal or Terrebonne for your first treatment, there are some things you should absolutely do. First, make sure you have your medical imaging reports (X-ray, MRI, or ultrasound) available.
  • Also, make sure you are aware of the various possible risks and side effects associated with treatment at Tagmed Clinic. You should also take all necessary measures (ex. Apply ice to the inflamed area to ensure that your body is ready for further treatment.
  • Also, make sure you are aware of the various possible risks and side effects associated with treatment at Tagmed Clinic. You should also take all necessary measures (ex. Apply ice to the inflamed area to ensure that your body is ready for further treatment.
  • Finally, if you were unable to complete our form, as mentioned above, arrive 15 minutes before your appointment time to ensure you have enough time to discuss your condition, make the assessment and your treatment.

To be completed before your consultation at TAGMED clinic

Download, print and complete this questionnaire (your health history), before consulting us, in order to save time. (Click on the tablet!)

Clinical TAGMED
Terrebonne:

1150 rue Levis, suite 200, Terrebonne, QC, J6W 5S6
 (450) 704-4447

Clinical TAGMED
Montreal

1140 ave Beaumont, Mont-Royal, QC, H3P 3E5
 1-877-672-9060