Tunnel carpien

8 avril 2018

Seeing the Light

How Light Therapy is surprising skeptics and gaining converts By Rich Smith Once he saw the light, a 59-year-old Texan became a changed man. Not emotionally or spiritually, but physically. The man was a patient at Park Cities Physical Therapy in Dallas, suffering from right upper extremity reflex sympathetic dystrophy. A diabetic with heart disease, he’d developed complex regional pain syndrome after a surgical procedure that compromised circulation in his forearm and hand.    
8 avril 2018

COLD LASERS IN PAIN MANAGEMENT

Low energy laser therapy has been shown — at appropriate dosimetry, wavelength, duration, and site-specific application — to reduce tissue pain/tenderness, normalize circulation patterns in tissue trauma, and increase collagen formation in wounds. by Tiziano Marovino, PT, DPT, MSc, BA, BHSc, BRLS, Dip.PT, FAAPM    
8 avril 2018

“HEALTH”

– Sebastian Sun, October 9, 2003By Rachael Jackson, staff writer A new cold laser treatment can provide a surgery alternative for sufferers of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, athletic injuries; and other soft and connective tissue disorders. The treatment is painless and non-invasive and, according to MicrolightLaser®, its manufacturer, it can make the difference in full and partial recovery for Carpal Tunnel patients.   Cold, hard facts: New laser treats various illsFor years, the pain was so great Pat Ground couldn’t stand on her tiptoes. There were times when she could hardly walk. The Sebastian banker tried doctor after doctor, endured several types of treatments, but nothing seemed to make a real lasting difference in the swollen nerves in her feet. But now, after only a month of a new laser treatment by chiropractor Jeff Stepanek at Sebastian Chiropractic, Ground, 58, happily reports she can retrieve items from a top shelf without enduring tremendous pain from a condition called Morton’s Neuroma. Stepanek recently obtained the Microlight cold laser, which can treat a wide range of ailments. The laser offers a non-invasive treatment alternative for soft and connective tissue disorders such as athletic injuries, Morton’s Neuroma and Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, a stress injury […]
8 avril 2018

Low level laser therapy for tendinopathy. Evidence of a dose-response pattern

Bjordal JM et al University of Bergen, Section of Physiotherapy Science, 5020 Bergen, NORVEGE Physical Therapy Reviews 2001;6:91-99   To investigate whether low-level laser therapy (LLLT) can reduce pain from tendinopathy, we performed a review of randomized placebo-controlled trials with LLLT for tendinopathy. The literature search for trials using LLLT published after 1980 was conducted on Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Library, together with a hand-search of physiotherapy journals in English and Scandinavian languages. Validity assessment of each trial was done according to predefined criteria for location-specific dosage and irradiation of the skin directly overlying the affected tendon. The literature search identified 78 randomized controlled trials with LLLT, of which 20 included tendinopathy. Seven trials were excluded for not meeting validity criteria on treatment procedure or trial design. Twelve of the remaining 13 trials investigated the effect of LLLT for patients with subacute and chronic tendinopathy, and provided a pooled mean effect of 21% [95% confidence interval (CI) 5.9-36.1]. If results from only the nine trials adhering to assumed optimal treatment parameters were included, the mean effect over placebo increased to 32% (95% CI: 23.0-41.0). LLLT can reduce pain in subacute and chronic tendinopathy if a valid treatment procedure and […]
8 avril 2018

The Light Stuff

– Washington Post, February 17, 2004By Lois Lindstrom The New England Patriots won Super Bowl XXXVIII with some help from a little-known form of laser technology that could change the way athletic injuries and chronic pain are treated.   The treatment, known as “cold” laser therapy or low-level laser therapy (LLLT), has been used internationally for 18 years to treat soft tissue injuries, cervical neck pain, carpal tunnel syndrome, repetitive stress injuries, tendinitis, hamstring injuries, arthritis and wound healing, among others.The lasers — hand-held, flashlight-like devices that direct a beam of narrow-spectrum (but not hot) light at injured tissue beneath the skin — have been integrated into medical practice in Japan, Russia and the United Kingdom. In the United Kingdom, cold laser therapy has become a preferred treatment for “whiplash” injuries, neuralgia and shingles. In Japan, the lasers were approved in 1987 and are in widespread use today.In the United States, the technology received marketing clearance from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2002 for treating carpal tunnel syndrome, a painful inflammation of the wrists and hands that results from repetitive motion. But the mainstream medical establishment still considers the cold laser’s benefits unproven. Most U.S. users are athletic […]